Category Archives: equipment

Phone Sex Work: What Type of Phone Is Best?

phone sex operatorIf you are considering becoming a phone sex operator (PSO) it’s kind of obvious that you’ll need a phone — but the type of phone you have and use for your calls can greatly impact your income. The two biggest issues you’ll want to consider are a reliable connection and excellent sound quality. If either of these features is poor, it will affect your bottom line as calls will end unnecessarily with a poor connection and callers will be less likely to call back if your sound quality isn’t good.

So, keeping those two issues in mind, here’s a breakdown of the options available to you:

Landlines: In the past, most reliable in connectivity and sound quality. However, as landlines are falling out of favor and therefore the companies that run them are making significantly less profits, line upgrades are also declining, and aging lines mean more issues. The general consensus seems to be that analog phone is on its way out and digital will be the future. But as far as overall quality for what a PSO looks for — it’s not really top choice if digital phone is an option for you (which it isn’t for everyone — read on).

Digital Phone: In the early days of digital phone, dropped packets were a big problem with both connectivity and sound quality; not so any more, so this option is growing in leaps in bounds, as are the advances in technology, making this top choice overall if this is offered in your area. “Bad Internet” isn’t really an issue here because this service is only offered in areas with “good internet” so the issues of bandwidth etc. are null. Generally speaking — a top choice for PSOs.

caveat: Both of the above options are GREATLY affected by what type of phone is used. A cordless phone is going to seriously drop the quality of the call, and a hardlined phone is strongly recommended.

VoIP: For those not familiar, this would be Skype, Google Voice, etc. Very similar to digital phone with a couple of exceptions: it requires software to run and it is usable in areas that don’t offer digital phone because the digital lines are not up to par for digital phone. The big issues with that: if you have a slow computer and a poor internet connection, it will result in poor connectivity and sound quality and dropped calls will definitely be an issue. HOWEVER, if you have a speedy computer and a good internet connection (if digital phone is offered in your area, odds are you have good internet), this is less of an issue. As with the aforementioned, however, going wireless (aka cordless) in any way is going to affect quality. If your internet/computer are good AND your computer is hardwired to your modem and not wireless AND you use USB headset/microphone (not the mic that comes w/ your computer) — this option is as good as digital phone. That’s a lot of IFS and ANDS, though, so you have to consider all of the above when choosing between the options.

Cell phones: Not surprisingly, the bottom in connctivity and sound quality. However, if you have a great connection, it’s generally going to be an infrequent problem related to cell carrier issues and not your phone itself. As for technological advances being made, cell phones are obviously at the top of the pack, so research generally points to better and better cell reception/call quality as time goes on, although cell reception is going to continue to be an issue in areas where towers are scarce. A plus to cell phones is of course, portability. You can use it anywhere, any time. Do NOT use Bluetooth or other handsfree wireless options (a plug in mic/headphones is fine) as this drops quality very significantly and I’d suggest avoiding it big time as a PSO.

Each of the above options has its pluses and minuses and there really is no one option that is going to work best for everyone. You may have to try a couple of different options before you find the one that works best for you and you may also find yourself using more than one type of phone line — a landline when you are home and a cell when you are on the road, for example.

Good luck and happy whoring to all!

Fiona Foremost

Fiona Foremost: Femdom, Audio Goddess and kinky PSO

Best Equipment For The Job: Lighting

By Sydney Screams

If you’re doing more than webcamming, you are going to need good lighting. Most cameras require better lighting than what the average person happens to have at their home; floor lamps and table lamps tend to only have one, low wattage bulb that doesn’t give off enough light needed to produce a quality image. You’re going to need better (and more) equipment than a few standard home lamps, and you’re going to have to pay for it. As a producer or self-producing model, lighting is key. Luckily, there are several options depending on your budget and your needs. Ask yourself a few questions before you choose what to buy: Do you travel a lot? What is your budget? How many lights do you need? How many lights do you have space for? How many people are you generally shooting?

Saving by buying one light is a great way to start, although you’ll find that buying individual lights will quickly add up since kits tend to be cheaper options. My personal two favorite budget brands for lighting are Cowboy Studios and Smith Victor. Both offer budget lighting (although you may not initially think so based on the $100-700+ light kits). Both Cowboy Studios and Smith Victor offer a range in lighting kits that may or may not include a carrying case (a must if you travel a lot), and include anywhere from one light up to four lights. Although you may think that you only need one light, you’ll then have the problem of shadows. You can easily start off with one light (around $90 for a 5 bulb light with soft box and light stand) and then add a second once you are able to afford to do so. However, if you can afford to go ahead and get a 2-3 light kit right off the bat, I recommend doing so! Smith Victor offers a 1250-Watt 3 light kit (2 regular lights, plus a hair light, 3 stands, umbrellas and carrying case) for around $275 http:// Alternatively, Cowboy Studio offers a 3300-Watt 3 light kit (2 regular lights, plus hair light, 3 stands, 3 soft boxes and carrying case) for $250 . With video lighting, avoid getting a lighting kit with less than 1000 watts. While you may not need 1250 or 3300 watts that come with either of these two options, having too much light is better than having not enough. You can always turn off a bulb or two, whereas you can’t always add a bulb or two.

Having good lighting makes the difference between “eh” and “wow!” quality when you are selling clips. Your customers will notice a difference and trust me when I say that nobody complains about better quality content. Just a tip: You don’t need to shine the light directly on yourself unless there’s a soft box or umbrella, but bouncing light off the ceiling will provide you with clean, soft lighting. Having good, soft light will make the HD look better, but also soften out your skin, which in turn makes you look better! Win!

Sydney Screams: Fetish Model, Clip Producer, Adult Actress, Radio Talk Show Host

The Best Equipment For the Job: Buying A Camera

By Sydney Screams

Choosing a camera for work is no walk in the park. You have a lot of options out there to choose from, all of which will have positive and negative aspects. Cheap is very appealing, hence the popularity of the wave of handheld cameras similar to the FlipCam, but the quality of these cameras is low. These cameras are fine to start off with, but be warned: you’ll be upgrading within 6 months to a year. If you can afford to do so, hold off until you have more money saved so that you can get a better quality camera. If you need a camera that is great for both photos and videos, a point and shoot is good option, although not your best investment option. A good point and shoot will run anywhere between $200-500. The microphones on point and shoots are generally awkwardly placed where you will more than likely cover them up if someone is holding the camera for you. The sensor is not as good (or large) which means even on HD settings, videos will come out grainy if lighting isn’t perfect. The plus side of point and shoot cameras is that many are now water proof, drop proof, crush proof, etc, so if you’re like me and want to record yourself in the shower, you can do that without having to be super careful! Or you can film giantess clips and jump on your camera without worrying about breaking it. Canon’s Powershot D20, Olympus TG 820 iHS, and Sony Cyber-shot DSC-TX20 are all waterproof and shoot 1080p HD, and all run around $300-350.

When looking for a camera for both photos and videos, getting a DSLR is your best investment. Both Canon and Nikon make great beginner line cameras that take 1080p HD video as well as good quality images (as long as you have good lighting!). The problem with the lower end Nikon cameras is when shooting at 1080p, the camera will automatically stop shooting at the 5 minute mark. The other problem with DSLRs is that you should expect to dish out at least $700- 1000 for a kit (both camera and lens) plus the cost of SD cards (you’ll need either 32 or 64 GB ones if you’re shooting 1080p HD), an additional battery, and a carrying case. You can find bundles on both Amazon and Ebay, but make sure you’re buying from a verified seller! You can find used DSLRs, but be sure you’re getting one with video capabilities! Not all DSLRs have that capability. If you don’t know how to use a DSLR, expect to get one from Canon’s Rebel line (such as the EOS Rebel T2i) or Nikon’s D3200 or D5100. These offer fully automatic and fully manual modes and are considered the most affordable and user friendly. With a DSLR, you will want to get a microphone that you can slip into the hot shoe, as the microphone on the DSLR is mediocre at best. Luckily microphones aren’t expensive and some bundles even come with them now! A DSLR is great if you’re running your own site that requires the need for both photos and videos. Remember that photos make for great teasers or advertisements! When shopping for used equipment, check out Canon’s or Nikon’s Refurbished Store or B&H’s online used store.

If you want a video camera that is strictly for video, there are a few things you want to make sure you get. 1-a threaded lens (so you can add wide angle or zoom filters. Look for “filter diameter” when you’re looking at the specs), 2-a hot shoe (so you can have an on camera light or on camera microphone), 3-multiple SD card slots OR internal memory PLUS an SD slot (in case you run out of space on one, it will automatically switch to the second one without skipping a beat), and 4-the ability to use different size batteries (ie, no battery slot cover). When it comes to a strictly video camera, Sony and Canon are the leading companies, although I personally recommend avoiding Sony as once you start using Sony you are stuck with their products (their video cameras do not use standard memory cards, instead a Sony only memory card that cannot be used on non-Sony products). A video camera can be much cheaper than getting a DSLR, but again, you have to worry about quality and the lower end ones don’t always have the threads on the front. I cannot stress the importance of those threads on the front—most video cameras don’t zoom out far enough to accommodate the average size 12’x12’ bedroom. A wide angle lens then becomes a must so that you can fit yourself into frame properly! Canon’s Vixia HF M500 has allows for SD and SDXC cards, lets you choose which format you record in and runs only $550. If you can really afford to splurge, Canon’s Vixia HF G10 goes above and beyond with manual modes (both exposure and focus), has internal memory plus allows for dual SD or SDXC cards, allows for a larger battery for longer run time, and is my personal video camera wet dream (can I point you to my Amazon wishlist right about now??). It runs $1300, but is well worth it based on the quality you’ll get.

When you’re shopping for any camera, I always recommend going into a camera store or electronics store to hold them. See what feels best in your hand, see which ones have the easiest controls for YOU to figure out. I’ve been using cameras pretty much since I could walk, so what works for me may not work for you. See how the picture quality looks in the store lighting conditions. Double check to make sure the front of the camera has threads so that you can screw on a wide angle lens. Whatever you do, DO NOT BUY IN STORE unless you’re getting a really great package. Have an idea of 4 or 5 cameras you’d like to look at when you go in, and know what they’re going for on Amazon, eBay and B&H with or without a bundle (SD cards, an additional battery, case, tripod, etc). If, in the off chance, the store you’re at can offer you the same price with the same bundle, by all means, go ahead and buy, but generally speaking, you’re going to get a better deal online. Remember that stores generally only carry the latest models, but going back a generation or two will save you anywhere from $50-200. Before you buy a camera, be sure to check out the reviews online, specifically for any “photo” cameras (DSLRs or point & shoots only) where you can do a side by side comparison of specs and features.

Sydney Screams: Fetish Model, Clip Producer, Adult Actress, Radio Talk Show Host